How do you create a Trump?

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Illustration by Cristiana Couceiro/Newsline; AP Images; Creative Commons

[My understanding is that you would have one or both parents who have Narcissistic Personality Disorder, a Cluster B PD and/or periods of neglect accompanied by periods of indulgence.]

For so long, Donald Trump has talked often about the profound influence of Fred Trump. “That’s why I’m so screwed up, because I had a father that pushed me pretty hard,” he wrote in his 2007 book, Think Big.  [Suspect for narcissism.]

When I would play with Donald,” says Mark Golding, an early pal, “his father would be around and watch him play. His mom didn’t interact in that way.” That’s the recollection, too, of Lou Droesch, who was buddies with Fred Trump Jr. and knew his kid brother as a nettlesome tag-along. “We rarely saw Mrs. Trump,” he told me, saying she did sometimes give them money to take him to go get some ice cream. “But we did see a lot of the housekeeper.” This distance, according to a former close business associate and friend, is a dynamic that never changed. “Donald was in awe of his father,” this person said, “and very detached from his mother.”  [Quiet like Melania, going with whatever the patriarch wants, or incapable of connecting with a child due to mental health, trauma, PD?]

That year, according to Vanity Fair, Mary Trump asked Ivana Trump, her soon-to-be-ex-daughter-in-law, a pointed question. “What kind of son have I created?”  [Distant or realistic mother?  I remember reading she was very upset about Donald abandoning his families.]

Severe hemorrhaging necessitated an emergency hysterectomy, which led to a serious abdominal infection, which led to more surgeries. “Four in something like two weeks,” Maryanne Trump Barry would tellTrump biographer Gwenda Blair. It was uncertain whether Mary Trump would survive. “My father came home and told me she wasn’t expected to live,” Barry said, “but I should go to school and he’d call me if anything changed. That’s right—go to school as usual!”  [Sounds like a family where emotions were safe and empathy was cultivated!  Not at all a recipe for the lack of empathy of narcissism.]

“It’s interesting,” Trump said to journalist Charlie Rose, back in 1992. “One of my attorneys said, ‘Always count on your mother.’ Now, you know, I maybe took advantage of my mother. I never appreciated her as much … ”  [My suspicion is that Donald Trump’s mother saw him eventually grow up to be like her husband, and she became another quiet ornament in his life, useful only in the acquisition of his goals.]

He often cast his mother in cameos in the show that is his life. At the top of the list: her role as the reason he wanted to build his golf club in Balmedie, Scotland, some 200 miles away and on the other side of the country from Tong. Trump announced his intention in 2006, and the course opened in 2012. “I love the Scotch; I’m Scotch myself,” he said during a visit, using a term that Scots, the citizens of Scotland, consider offensive, and better suited to describe their whisky. “I wanted to do something special for my mother,” he told reporters during a trip in the summer of 2008. On his way to the site where the course was to be built, he had his plane land in Stornoway and visited his mother’s birthplace for the first time since his childhood. “I haven’t been back,” he told reporters, “because I’ve been busy having some fun in New York—let’s put it that way.” He was with his sister Maryanne, who had visited 24 times before. He said there was “zero” truth to the notion that he was using his mother to gin up publicity for his golf project in her country. The stop in Tong lasted three hours, and he spent 97 seconds inside the house where his mother grew

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/11/03/mary-macleod-trump-donald-trump-mother-biography-mom-immigrant-scotland-215779

 

For more:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/understanding-narcissism/201705/how-do-children-become-narcissists

 

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